Waldorf Education Featured on The Simpsons Season Finale

 

Denver, CO, May 20, 2015: The Simpsons gave a well-crafted, comic shout out to Waldorf Education during their Season 26 finale for 2015 — “Mathlete’s Feat”, which aired May 17, 2015. The Association of Waldorf Schools of North America was pleased with the level of in-depth knowledge The Simpsons writers clearly possessed about pedagogy and stereotypes associated with Waldorf Education, which made this fun caricature both lighthearted and flattering.

After a server farm crash, Springfield Elementary loses all technology. This is when Lisa comes up with an idea that will save the school — “Learning while Doing.” Springfield Elementary becomes a Waldorf school! From there the students learn by doing in tongue-in-cheek fashion and at the end of the episode, their new Waldorf Education helps them win the mathlete rematch.

We are honored to have been featured in such a positive light in The Simpsons Season Finale and some schools are responding in-kind with Waldorf tributes to The Simpsons. A collective of handmade hats is being created to send to The Simpsons writers. The Waldorf School of Philadelphia is having students create beeswax figures of The Simpsons characters to share online and with The Simpsons execs. And the São Paulo, Brazil Waldorf school has done an amazing rendition of The Simpsons Theme Song, found here on YouTube, as a tribute to this mainstream recognition.

Do you have questions about this latest press coverage of Waldorf Education or about Waldorf Education in general? Please contact Leigh Ann Hill, Enrollment Director at enroll@denverwaldorf.org or 303-777-0531 ext. 106.

Carolyn’s College Corner – April 2015

by Carolyn Francis

Free and Almost Free College Options
Work Colleges – Work, Learning, Service

There are seven small schools in the Work Colleges Consortium that help students graduate with considerably less college debt than most of their peers. All member colleges help students graduate with limited debt; three are tuition free for qualified students.

Students arrive on campus understanding work will be an integral part of their college experience. Not only does this style of college give students work and life skills, it also creates “buy-in” for students; having a little skin in the game generates appreciation and a sense of accomplishment.

This unusual approach helps students learn a critical balance of study, community service and managed work expectations. Most work positions are limited to 8-15 hours a week with each school tailoring the jobs to the mission and operational needs of the individual school. Administrative and campus support in food services or landscaping are typical entry level posts.

Member Colleges’ work programs provide promising students with a means to earn a college degree while students get opportunities to advance and tailor work positions to meet career goals. It is a win-win for everyone. Work Programs cultivate career-ready qualities like responsibility and work ethic.

Alice Lloyd College – located in Kentucky, ALC charges no tuition for students from its geographic area. The Top College in America for graduating students with the least amount of debt, 95% of ALC graduates are accepted to professional or graduate school.

Berea College – also located in Kentucky. Founded in 1855, Berea was the first interracial and coeducational college in the South. Berea awards four year tuition scholarships to all its students who otherwise could not afford a high-quality, residential, liberal arts education. The work program has been a part of the Berea for over a century.

Blackburn College – located in Illinois and celebrating its 175th anniversary, Blackburn has had a work program since 1913. Over the years, students have built Blackburn brick by brick. Ten buildings were constructed with the help of student workers.

College of the Ozarks – located in Missouri, C of O is a Christian institution where students work in one of 80 different assignments. The cost of tuition is covered by students work, grants, and scholarships provided by the school. Student work performance grades are included in student records, giving an impressive set of credentials to employers.

Ecclesia College – located in Arkansas, the student motto is “Where Leaders are Learning”. Ecclesia serves students regardless of family resources. Students graduate with character, skills and resumes and with an average debt of $5,938 while national average is $25,250.

Sterling College – the only school not located in the South or Midwest, Sterling is located in a small town in northern Vermont. A small progressive liberal arts school with a focus on environmental issues and grass roots sustainability, they offer majors in Ecology, Environmental Humanities, Outdoor Education, Sustainable Agriculture and Sustainable Food Systems. Students can also design their own major. Some examples include Agroecology, Environmental Justice, Conservation education and International Agriculture and Business. Sterling came to visit DWS last fall and I was personally very impressed. The right student would be very well served by this little school!

Warren Wilson College – located in North Carolina, this school is well known for its strong international and environmental emphasis. The Fiske Guide recognized WWC as one of the “25 Best Buys” among private colleges and universities. In addition to awarding high marks for its academics, social life and affordability, the Fiske Guide honored the College with the highest possible rating for overall quality of student life.

Thanks to workcolleges.org for the above information.

These schools offer students with limited financial means the opportunity to receive a high quality education, life skills and professional growth not found in traditional school settings. While many are located in what we might call remote areas, there is a reason these schools are situated in the areas they are. Assisting an underserved population, these schools were initially designed to help locals receive an education. Many of these alums go on to be leaders in their region. With outreach and growth come new opportunities for students all over the country. While the initial incentive is financial in nature, taking a deeper look will show schools that are invested in providing a world class education.

Don’t Miss Senior Projects!

The Class of 2015 is proud to present their Senior Project Presentations to our school community. Will you be there to hear the results of their endeavors? These presentations represent the culmination of their Waldorf High School education, and are the product of a full year of independent work, guided by dedicated mentors.

Each presentation is unique and highly personal – like mini TED talks from Waldorf students! They’ll explain why they chose their topic, what struggles they encountered and how they overcame challenges along the way. In addition, the students will talk about a variety of passion projects that range from the mechanical to the artistic to the adventurous and beyond. Perfect for all ages! Bring your friends and neighbors.

Senior-Project-Presentation-Poster-v1-for-Web

 

8th Grade Presents “The Sound of Music”

Join us for Mrs. Doyle White’s class performance of “The Sound of Music” – Thursday, March 26th & Friday, March 27th at 6:00 pm in the Festival Hall. Admission is free.

Sound-of-Music-Poster

 

poster art by Tallulah Martin, 8th Grade

School Closed Today 2/26/15

The Denver Waldorf School will be closed for school on Thursday, February 26, 2015.

Shepherds’ Play Community Performance

Join us for this year’s Shepherds’ Play!

Shepherds Play

Carolyn’s College Corner: Colleges of Wisconsin

Carolyn’s College Corner

COWS: Colleges of Wisconsin, or a Tale of Four Colleges

In early May, I toured four different colleges in Wisconsin as part Wisconsin-Cropof a Continuing Education program for educational consultants. These schools put on these tours a couple of times a year in an effort to bring students to this much-maligned state! Personally, I fell in love with Wisconsin. Granted, I was there at the beginning of spring, a time when love is in the air, the birds are chirping and flowers and trees are budding. That being said, I am sure the winters bring new meaning to the word cold, but each school chips away at that objection ably. I would not hesitate to send one of my own children to one of these schools. For those of you who know me, my oldest went to Maine for college – a fact he has not let me forget! Good news is they appreciate their home and where they came from. They realize how good they have it in sunny Colorado!

First stop – Marquette University in Milwaukee. A wonderful option in the Jesuit school consortium, Marquette is often over looked by Coloradoans in favor of Creighton or Gonzaga. Marquette University is:

  • Jesuit – lifelong learning is the foundation of the Jesuit tradition. Inquiry and critical thinking is the cornerstone of the education. Service is a strong component here – 97% of students do some kind of service learning
  • Diverse – 30 foreign countries are represented here encompassing all cultures and religious beliefs.
  • Urban – wonderful downtown location with easy access to all many activities and cultural events city has to offer. The biggest surprise to me was how cosmopolitan and hip Milwaukee is – it is like a mini Chicago. I loved it!
  • University – there is a University Core of Common Studies with requirements across 9 disciplines. They are not crippling to a schedule, in fact, I believe they help students open their minds to areas they would not have normally considered.

Marquette is comprised of 83 majors, 7 colleges, boasts a 4 year graduation rate, and 1 campus.
Colleges are as follows:

  • Klingler College of Arts and sciences
  • College of Business Administration
  • Diederich College of Communications
  • College of Education
  • College of Engineering
  • College of Health Sciences
  • College of Nursing

Student apply directly into a specific college, usually a 1st and 2nd choice are required. It can be hard to move from a college into Engineering as it has very sequential course work.
Admissions are conducted in a holistic manner, meaning the entire application is considered, not just grades and scores. GPA is unweighted, rigor of curriculum is considered, essays are read and evaluated, and then test scores are reviewed – in that order. Mean ACT score is 27 and mean SAT is 1210.

There are multiple scholarships available as well – see the website for more particulars.

Second stop – Lawrence University in Appleton, Wisconsin. An unusual school in the higher education firmament as it is one of the only schools that offer a music conservatory side by side with a liberal arts program. Some highlights are:

  • ¾ of the school is arts and sciences and ¼ the conservatory of music. About half of the students double major in a conservatory/arts and sciences major, a 5 year program
  • One application for everyone. Music auditions for the conservatory or mandatory with 4 on campus auditions and 12 regional auditions
  • The most competitive disciplines are voice, piano, and strings. Always looking for students with talent in more obscure instruments
  • Classes in music for non-music majors
  • Non-music majors can participate in music programs including chamber groups, symphony and vocal ensembles.
  • All concerts are webcast
  • Language requirement – 200 level
  • Capstone for all students – paper, recital, and/or presentation.
  • Laboratory research common with access to paid summer internships

The Lawrence Personality

  • Curious students
  • Engaging
  • Collaborative (you kind of have to be in music!)
  • Positive and friendly
  • Energetic
  • Academic but well balanced

Lawrence has a residential campus – all 4 years, and is located in Appleton, a medium size community along the banks of a lovely meandering river.

Third stop – Ripon College in Ripon, Wisconsin. South of Appleton and north of Beloit, Ripon is set in the rolling hills of central Wisconsin. Named one of the “Coolest Small Towns in America,” downtown Ripon boasts an eclectic mix of architecture, shops, restaurants and coffee shops in one little down town. Ripon College consistently shows up on lists of colleges that offer the best value, which measure value, quality and overall student satisfaction. Ripon’s rating hovers around 95%. Here are a few facts:

  • 32 majors, 48 minors and pre-professional programs are available
  • Pre-professional programs are customized course plans setting the student on track for competitive placement in engineering, law, and medicine, among others.
  • 80% acceptance rate to medical school – twice the national average
  • Committed to affordability with 98% of students receiving aid awards
  • Scholarships range from $10,000 to full
  • Awards from $1,000 to $5,000
  • Grants college/state/federal from $600 to $19,000
  • Federal loans
  • 4 year graduation guarantee, assuming student is in good standing academically and does not change majors
  • Median class size is 17 with a 12:1 student/faculty ratio
  • Study abroad programs available
  • Division III athletics with 21 varsity teams

Fourth stop – Beloit College in Beloit, Wisconsin. Beloit College has always been one of my favorites. As a Colleges That Change Lives school, it produces top notch students. A few fun facts:

  • Top 20 college for producing future PhD’s
  • Top 21 college for training future leaders in science, international relations and business

The town of Beloit has come a long way since I first visited it 5 years ago. A former General Motors town, it has had to pull itself up by the bootstraps to overcome the economic crash and reinvent itself. Both the town and the college have an eclectic mix of things going on:

  • Believe it or not, Beloit is the home of the Beloit International Film Festival.
  • Organic potato chip factory
  • Organic market
  • Home of The Mind Set List; a list published in August with a snap shot of how the incoming freshman class views the world
  • Study abroad and international studies are strong with over 30 programs.
  • One of the best museum studies program in the country with a world class Archeology department and museum. The Indiana Jones character is based on an actual professor from Beloit, complete with bullwhip and hat!
  • 85% receive financial aid

Students coming to Beloit are:

  • Not likely to follow the crowd
  • Risk takers, out of the box thinkers
  • Interested in many things – open minded
  • Leaders, not followers
  • No core curriculum
  • Every student’s course of study or major is different

Carolyn’s College Corner: Scholarship & Financial Aid

Carolyn’s College Corner: Scholarship & Financial Aid

A Few Tidbits Going Forward…

New college search engine based on costs
It may be a bit late for you to fully benefit from this new college search engine, but it might help you compare the colleges that you’re already applying to. CollegeRealityCheck.com is sponsored by The Chronicle of Higher Education and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and the interactive search tool takes into consideration factors such as “net price based on actual family income, projected monthly student loan payments, and potential earnings after graduation.” Their byline is: “Compare colleges by facts, not fluff.” Worth a look!

FAFSA
For those of you who will be filing a Free Application for Federal Student Aid in order to apply for need-based financial aid, paper versions of the FAFSA are no longer being mailed to high schools. You are strongly encouraged to complete and submit the FAFSA online at www.fafsa.ed.gov. If, however, you would like a paper copy of the application, you may request one by calling toll-free the Federal Student Aid Information Center at 1-800-4-FED-AID (1-800-433-3243). You can also access a PDF version of the form that you can complete online, print out and mail, or print out, complete by hand, and mail. Read all about FAFSA filing options at http://www.fafsa.ed.gov/options.htm.

If you’d like a quick way to determine if you’re likely to qualify for need-based aid, access the Fafsa4caster via a link on the FAFSA home page: www.fafsa.ed.gov. Also, you can access a pdf version of the publication Funding Your Education: The Guide to Federal Student Aid, that includes basic information about student eligibility, the application process, and aid programs at http://www.studentaid.ed.gov/pubs. Also, here’s a good website for understandable explanations of financial aid applications: http://www.finaid.org/fafsa/.

Keep in mind that you can’t file the FAFSA before January 1 (when the current tax year is over), but most colleges need your FAFSA results in February, so aim to file no later than February 15

College Opportunity Fund for all students planning to attend college in Colorado
CollegeInColorado.org provides a link to the application for the College Opportunity Fund stipend that provides a tuition cost break for in-state students attending Colorado colleges and universities.

Reminders

Send your scores
Remember that most colleges require that you have your standardized test scores sent directly from the testing agency. To send your scores, go online to http://sat.collegeboard.org/scores/send-sat-scores (SAT) and/or www.actstudent.org/scores/send (ACT) and have a credit card handy. (College Board allows students who have taken the SAT with a fee waiver four no-charge score reports sent to colleges, in addition to the up to four reports that you may have requested sent straight to colleges when you registered for the test.) Also, keep in mind that in most cases, you may choose to send either your SAT or ACT scores. A small number of colleges, though, require SAT Subject Test scores in addition to ACT scores. Do your homework and know what your colleges require.
Gap Year Fair
Sunday, January 19, 2014, 1:00-3:30pm
Denver Academy, 4400 E. Iliff Avenue
If you’re even contemplating the benefits of a gap year — stepping off the education conveyor belt for a year to do something stimulating, eye-opening, energizing, and worthwhile, this will be well worth your time, so check it out!
Many reputable organizations that offer gap year programs will be available to offer information and answer questions.
Find out about the organizations involved at www.usagapyearfairs.org/programs
SAT/ACT test dates for early 2014
SAT – January 25th and March 8
ACT – February 8th and April 12th

Scholarship Opportunities

(While I would like to take credit for all the below information, I must give credit where credit is due. Thank you Kent Denver for the following information. I think there are some great possibilities here and within our own community)

SMART Scholarship (Science, Technology, and Research for Transformation)

  • Sponsored by the Department of Defense Defense (DoD) to “support undergraduate and graduate students pursuing degrees in science, technology, engineering and mathematics disciplines.”
  • $25,000 to $38,000 per year depending on one’s major. (For a list of majors, go to: http://smart.asee.org/about)
  • Applicants must have a GPA of at least 3.0, be able to participate in a summer internship, and be willing to work for the DoD after college graduation.
  • Application materials are at http://smart.asee.org
  • Deadline: December 16, 2013

Dell Scholars

    • $20,000 scholarships awarded to 300 high school seniors every year!
    • An initiative of the Michael and Susan Dell Foundation, which “recognizes students who have overcome significant obstacles to pursue their educations. In turn, these scholars serve as positive role models and change the trajectories for their siblings, friends and their communities.”
    • Minimum GPA: 2.4
    • Applicants must demonstrate financial need, self-motivation, and “determination to succeed.”
    • “The Dell Scholars Program is more than a check. Rather, the program aims to provide students with everything they need to begin and complete college.” In addition to scholarship money, “the Dell Scholars Program provides its students with technology, a private scholar networking community, resources, and mentoring to ensure they have the support they need to achieve their college degrees. Scholars become part of a support network for each other that is made up of themselves, their schools, families, peers and a dedicated Dell Scholar team at the Michael & Susan Dell foundation.”
    • The online application is easy to complete. Applicants selected as semi-finalists will be requires to submit additional materials. Find more information and a link to the application at www.dellscholars.org.
    • Deadline: January 15, 2014

SAE Engineering Scholarships

  • Applicants must enroll in an ABET-accredited engineering or related program, meet minimum requirements pertaining to GPA or ACT/SAT scores, and complete an essay about their engineering goals, plans, and experiences. (ABET is a nonprofit, non-governmental organization that accredits college and university programs in the disciplines of applied science, computing, engineering, and engineering technology.)
  • Scholarships range from $400 to full tuition
  • Learn more specifics and access an application at http://students.sae.org/awdscholar/scholarships (In the “Type of Scholarship” box, click on the “Freshman Year of College” link)
  • Deadline: January 15, 2014

PFLAG Denver Scholarship Program

  • Sponsored by the Denver chapter of PFLAG (Parents, Families, and Friends of Lesbians and Gays)
  • One $2,500 and two $1,000 scholarships “for LGBTQ high school seniors and their straight allies to recognize those students who are beacons in their communities, to encourage them to pursue post-secondary education and to promote a positive image of LGBTQ youth”
  • Applicants need a 2.5 GPA or better.
  • For the application, along with FAQs, go to www.pflagdenver.org
  • Deadline: February 28, 2014