Category Archives: News

Carolyn’s College Profiles: Lewis & Clark >>

College Profile: Lewis & Clark College

by Carolyn Francis, College Counselor

Lewis_&_Clark_College,_Frank_Manor_House,_View_from_Reflecting_PoolLocated just on the outskirts of Portland, Oregon, Lewis and Clark sits on an old estate complete with lush gardens and forest pathways. The campus itself is split in two by the forest – academics on one side and student life and dorms on the other. It seems appropriate for this campus to have these two different worlds, as Lewis and Clark is proud of their rich academic and intellectual life on one hand, and social diversity and the outdoor world on the other. When applying to Lewis and Clark consider this interesting option: you can submit a portfolio of work instead of test scores. This speaks to their desire to have diverse, well-rounded class rooms.

With a relaxed atmosphere and inclusive community, Lewis and Clark is one of the leading small liberal arts schools on the west coast. There is a Core Curriculum that highlights exploration and discovery. Freshman year includes Freshman Seminar, which is centered on reading and writing. After that, 3 semesters of language, 2 classes of international affairs, 1 lab science and 3 sections of quantitative reasoning are required to graduate. Credits are distributed in thirds; one third major, one third electives, and one third liberal arts core.

With an emphasis on international study as part of their core curriculum, 6 out of 10 students study abroad at some point during their time at Lewis and Clark. Ranging from 6 months to a year, there is no limit to what is available to students. Financial aid is transferable to abroad programs, making it easy for all who wish to engage in experiential learning to take part. Internships are available as are research opportunities with faculty.

Lewis and Clark also has two graduate programs, one in Law and the other in Educational Counseling. Undergraduates total 1,985 and graduate students are 685 in Law and 758 in Education.

Lewis and Clark has representation from students around the world, which is a point of pride for them. With their Northwest location, over 90% of students participate in the outdoor rec program. Well supplied with equipment and students running the programs, there is not much students can’t do here. A free shuttle bus runs from campus to downtown Portland 7 days a week from 7am to the early morning hours; a plus for students wishing to take advantage of Portland’s arts and culture without the hassle of driving.

Residential life is 2 years on campus with “living and learning” options. About half of students stay on campus all four years. Lewis and Clark is also generous with merit aid, need-based grants, loans and/or work study.

When I asked my guide to sum up Lewis and Clark in 3 words, he struggled, so I allowed him to fudge a little. His words were: beautiful, intellectual and complex with an interesting social fabric. There is more below the surface at Lewis and Clark than what you see on the surface.

DWS to Relocate to New Campus on S. Pennsylvania St. >>

DWS to Relocate to New Campus on S. Pennsylvania St.

School celebrates 40th anniversary with larger campus, more amenities, including gyms, fields and theater

WALDORF new building shot with flower tree(20 of 55)The Denver Waldorf School (DWS) is excited to announce their relocation to a new, larger campus at 2100 S. Pennsylvania Street in Denver. This move is an important milestone in the 40-year history of the school, and corresponds with the school’s upcoming accreditation by the Association of Colorado Independent Schools.

At more than 80,000 square feet, this new building is nearly double the size of the school’s current facility. The new campus offers two gymnasiums, a full theatrical stage, and abundant outdoor playing fields. The campus is located adjacent to Harvard Gulch Park, which provides access to natural open space that will further enhance The Denver Waldorf School’s educational programs.

“With the additional space, we can now realize our full vision for the school’s curriculum. This campus is full of amenities, including dedicated spaces for practical and performing arts, two gyms, science labs, and a library, among other highlights. We can expand our enrollment, particularly in the high school, which will foster a more vibrant experience for our students,” said Judy Lucas, the Administrative Director of The Denver Waldorf School.

DWS entered into a contract with Denver Christian Schools to buy the property. Denver Christian Schools are consolidating their three existing campuses and moving to a new location in Lakewood.

“This new campus gives our kids the chance to have a Waldorf education enhanced by even more space and greater resources. We are truly looking forward to this new opportunity,” said Anne Macomber, parent of two DWS students. DWS expects to open its doors on the Pennsylvania St. campus on August 29, in time for the start of the 2014-15 school year.

6th Grade Poets Consider Past and Future>>

6th Grade Poets Consider Past and Future

Students in Brianna Kaiser’s 6th Grade class wrote poems that examined their experiences this year and anticipate the changes ahead in the upcoming year.

Hugh Justice Poem

by Hugh Justice

6th Poem 11_0001

by Max Christensen

6th Poem 10_0001

by Makana Aiu

6th Poem 8_0001

by Ian Rowland

6th Poem 9_0001

by Zoe Garcia

6th Poem 7_0001

by Alaina Johansson

6th Poem 6_0001

by Jaden Price

6th Poem 5_0001

by Sumanje Chigwenembe

6th Poem 4_0001

by Walt Jones

6th Poem 3_0001

by Nikos Salinas

6th Poem 2_0001

by Ivy Secrest

6th Poem 1_0001

by Sophie Clark

6th Poem 12_0001

by Vander Georgeff

6th Poem 13_0001

by Oliver Sumners

6th Poem 14_0001

by Colton Opyd

6th Poem 15_0001

by Aiden Gustafson

6th Poem 16_0001

by Niko Sandusky

6th Poem 17_0001

by Simone Wahl

6th Poem 18_0001

by Annika Ceder

6th Poem 19_0001

by Will Roberts

6th Poem 20_0001

by Bryn Creager

6th Poem 21_0001

by Vincent Gibbons

6th Poem 22_0001

by Kayla Neill

6th Poem 23_0001

by Ruby Rodriguez

Xcel Energy Projects at DWS >>

Xcel Energy Projects Near DWS

The Denver Waldorf School received a notice from Xcel Energy about upcoming maintenance work in our neighborhood. We expect this gas line repair and street maintenance to temporarily disrupt our traffic flow and change the availability of street parking. They have told us to expect street closures on Fillmore St. and 10th Avenue, and possibly other streets adjacent to the school. We appreciate your patience with this necessary city infrastructure improvement project.

Click here to read the full statement from Xcel Energy >>

 

 

Waldorf Senior Relishes Drama Experience >>

Waldorf Senior Relishes Drama Experience

by Jake Smith ’14

After 11 years of class plays at The Denver Waldorf School, I am at the pinnacle of my acting career there and eagerly rehearsing for my final production. The drama program is a vital part of the Waldorf curriculum. Each year, every class performs a play. In the early grades, our plays were recited as a class in unison and always related directly to our studies. For example, in 3rd Grade we studied the Old Testament and performed the story of Moses.

Each year, the plays are more advanced. Students progress from speaking in unison to sharing parts with other students. By Middle School each student has an individual part. Diverse Middle School productions range from Shakespeare to Broadway musicals. In 8th Grade, our class performed “Fiddler on the Roof,” by Jerry Block. I played the role of Motel the tailor, husband of Tevye’s eldest daughter. This play really bonded our class and showed me that no matter how good my individual performance was, it took the whole class to put on a quality show.

In High School, an even tighter class with more acting ability has enhanced my theater experience. As Sophomores, we put on the comedy “Servant of Two Masters,” by Carlo Goldini. I enjoyed developing better comedic timing, and after the show, a friend said it was so funny, it made him cry.

Our Junior play, Sophocles’ tragedy “Antigone,” provided the test of a more serious role. It was much more difficult to transport myself into the role of a messenger who delivers the news to a father that his son has died. However, playing this sad part made me a better actor.

This year, I am excited to go back to comedy. Our Senior class will be performing “You Can’t Take It With You,” by Moss Hart and George S. Kaufman at the Bug Theatre, 3654 Navajo St., on March 6 and 8 at 7 pm. I play the part of Grandpa, an eccentric but happy old man. It will be difficult to embody an old man, but I am excited to meet the challenge.

Senior Play: You Can’t Take It With You>>

Senior Play: You Can’t Take It With You

Senior Class Play Poster 2014The familiar comic strip Dilbert has a twisted logic that contemporary readers understand to be an exaggerated version of reality. This year’s Senior class play, George S. Kaufmann and Moss Hart’s Pulitzer Prize winning romp You Can’t Take It with You, might be viewed as the Dilbert of the 1930’s.

Set in a time in history when undercurrents of fascism and communism seemed to threaten American freedoms, this madcap comedy is chock-full of eccentric characters who follow their passions, no matter how absurd they may seem.

These eccentric characters range from Mr. DePinna, who came to deliver the ice a few years back and never left, to Essie, who dreams of being a ballet dancer, to Penny who wants to write plays because a typewriter was accidentally delivered eight years ago.

Penny can’t finish a play and Essie will never be a good dancer, because, as her boisterous Russian ballet coach tells Grandpa, “She stinks.” Grandpa’s response goes to the heart of the play: “At least she’s having fun.”

And that is just the point. Why go through life serving up the daily grind when you could be doing what you truly want to do. Follow your passion! After all, you can’t take it with you.

The Senior class play is one of the jewels in the crown of a graduating class. Let’s support the Class of 2014 by giving them a full house as they take the stage for the last time in their Waldorf careers!

Thursday, March 6th & Saturday, March 8th at 7:00 pm
The Bug Theatre, 3654 Navajo St., Denver
(one door off the SE corner of 37th Ave. and Navajo St.)

Re-Enrollment is Just Around the Corner >>

Said Frog to Toad, “Re-enrollment is right around the corner.”

Or maybe it was actually “Spring is right around the corner,” but here at DWS we are getting ready for re-enrollment season. Your family’s packet will be mailed on February 3, 2014. If you do not receive a packet for the 2014-15 school year by Friday, February 7, 2014 please let us know by calling the enrollment office at 303-777-0531 ext. 106.

Tuition and Enrollment Contracts, re-enrollment fees ($350 per student) and Tuition Adjustment forms are all due on Friday, February 28, 2013. Completing and returning your Tuition and Enrollment Contract for each student to the school by this date ensures your student’s place in his/her class.

Tuition and Enrollment Contracts returned on March 1 or thereafter require the regular registration fee of $500 per student. Your registration fee must accompany your completed contract.

Questions? Please contact Leigh Rhysling, Enrollment Director, at 303-777-0531 ext. 106 or enroll@denverwaldorf.org.

A Reminder About Attendance Policies >>

A Reminder About Attendance Policies

by Christa Gustafson, Main Office Manager

Attendance policy for early childhood:

Early childhood children must be signed in and out every day. If your early childhood student will be absent or late, please let their teacher know.

Attendance Policies & Procedures for Grades 1-8

FAQ’s:

Do I really need a late slip?

You always need a late slip if you arrive after 8:25. There are some days that I won’t record late students up until 9:00 if the roads are bad, but late slips are always necessary.

Why are late slips always necessary?

To answer this question, I will describe a scenario that often happens:

The bell rings at 8:25. The children come in the building and go to their rooms. The teacher takes attendance, marking your child absent. Your child then arrives and goes to their room without getting a late slip. The attendance is delivered to the office with your child marked absent when in fact they were just late. I call you and say, “your child isn’t at school,” when in fact they are. Although I hate to make that type of call, I always err on the side of caution if I’m not sure why a child is absent. This call can be avoided by using late slips responsibly.

Following are excerpts from our parent handbook:

Lateness
When a child arrives late, he or she is being asked to jump onto a moving train. Lateness puts the student at a disadvantage and interrupts the class and the teacher. Every effort should be made to have your child arrive at school on time. Students in Grades 1 – 8 who arrive after 8:25 am must check in at the Main Office and obtain a late slip before joining his or her class.

Absences
If your Grades 1 – 8 child will be absent, please call the school’s Main Office at extension 100 no later than 9:00 a.m. If your Nursery/Preschool/Kindergarten child will be absent, please leave a message for your child’s teacher. If your High School child will be absent, please call the High School at extension 109 no later than 8:00 a.m.

For the safety of the children it is necessary that they all be accounted for every morning. If a Grades 1-8 teacher reports a child as absent to the Main Office and we have not heard from a parent, we will attempt to contact the parents to make sure the child’s whereabouts is known. Please see the High School handbook for policies specific to the High School.

Planned absences are discouraged. If you know in advance that your child must miss school, please inform his or her teacher and the Main Office Manager. The student is responsible for getting assignments from the teacher before a planned absence. Try to schedule doctor and dentist appointments after school hours.

If you must pick up your children during the day some time before dismissal, you must sign them out outside the Main Office so that we know they are no longer in the building. Children in Grade 8 and younger may not sign themselves out.

Attendance policies for the High School:

Students are expected to arrive five to ten minutes before their first class and remain for the entire day except in case of illness or when an absence has been excused. This means that students are not to leave school early without authorization from a parent or guardian. In the event a student needs to leave school during the school day they or their parent/guardian must sign them out at the main office in addition to informing both the appropriate high faculty and either the HS Coordinator or the Director of Student Services. If a student then returns back to the school they or their parent/guardian are required to sign them back in at the main office.

Skipping classes will result in disciplinary action to be determined by the HS Coordinator and teacher whose class was skipped and/or the Director of Student Services. Students also are expected to attend every school event scheduled for the HS, including festivals and assemblies.

Unscheduled absences should be telephoned in by the parent/guardian to the HS office before 8:00 a.m. A phone call from a student is not sufficient to excuse an absence. Doctor and/or dental appointments should be scheduled for hours outside of school whenever possible. Students who are too ill to be in academic classes are considered to be too ill to be able to attend afternoon and/or extracurricular activities.

Make-up work after absences is at the discretion of the teacher. When absence is for all or a major portion of a block, the teacher will determine how the student may best make up the work. The student is responsible to approach the respective teacher to make up work. A record showing excessive tardiness and/or absence will be brought to a HS faculty meeting for review. Excessive absence/tardiness may affect the student’s ability to fulfill requirements for the class and/or graduation.

It should not be assumed that family vacation times can be extended into school time. Permission to miss school (for college visits, for example) should be coordinated through the HS faculty and administration and must be scheduled well in advance without the assumption that permission will be automatically granted.

When a student is not present in class or on the premises when they are supposed to be, every effort will be made to contact a parent by telephone.