Carolyn’s College Corner: Colleges of Wisconsin

Carolyn’s College Corner

COWS: Colleges of Wisconsin, or a Tale of Four Colleges

In early May, I toured four different colleges in Wisconsin as part Wisconsin-Cropof a Continuing Education program for educational consultants. These schools put on these tours a couple of times a year in an effort to bring students to this much-maligned state! Personally, I fell in love with Wisconsin. Granted, I was there at the beginning of spring, a time when love is in the air, the birds are chirping and flowers and trees are budding. That being said, I am sure the winters bring new meaning to the word cold, but each school chips away at that objection ably. I would not hesitate to send one of my own children to one of these schools. For those of you who know me, my oldest went to Maine for college – a fact he has not let me forget! Good news is they appreciate their home and where they came from. They realize how good they have it in sunny Colorado!

First stop – Marquette University in Milwaukee. A wonderful option in the Jesuit school consortium, Marquette is often over looked by Coloradoans in favor of Creighton or Gonzaga. Marquette University is:

  • Jesuit – lifelong learning is the foundation of the Jesuit tradition. Inquiry and critical thinking is the cornerstone of the education. Service is a strong component here – 97% of students do some kind of service learning
  • Diverse – 30 foreign countries are represented here encompassing all cultures and religious beliefs.
  • Urban – wonderful downtown location with easy access to all many activities and cultural events city has to offer. The biggest surprise to me was how cosmopolitan and hip Milwaukee is – it is like a mini Chicago. I loved it!
  • University – there is a University Core of Common Studies with requirements across 9 disciplines. They are not crippling to a schedule, in fact, I believe they help students open their minds to areas they would not have normally considered.

Marquette is comprised of 83 majors, 7 colleges, boasts a 4 year graduation rate, and 1 campus.
Colleges are as follows:

  • Klingler College of Arts and sciences
  • College of Business Administration
  • Diederich College of Communications
  • College of Education
  • College of Engineering
  • College of Health Sciences
  • College of Nursing

Student apply directly into a specific college, usually a 1st and 2nd choice are required. It can be hard to move from a college into Engineering as it has very sequential course work.
Admissions are conducted in a holistic manner, meaning the entire application is considered, not just grades and scores. GPA is unweighted, rigor of curriculum is considered, essays are read and evaluated, and then test scores are reviewed – in that order. Mean ACT score is 27 and mean SAT is 1210.

There are multiple scholarships available as well – see the website for more particulars.

Second stop – Lawrence University in Appleton, Wisconsin. An unusual school in the higher education firmament as it is one of the only schools that offer a music conservatory side by side with a liberal arts program. Some highlights are:

  • ¾ of the school is arts and sciences and ¼ the conservatory of music. About half of the students double major in a conservatory/arts and sciences major, a 5 year program
  • One application for everyone. Music auditions for the conservatory or mandatory with 4 on campus auditions and 12 regional auditions
  • The most competitive disciplines are voice, piano, and strings. Always looking for students with talent in more obscure instruments
  • Classes in music for non-music majors
  • Non-music majors can participate in music programs including chamber groups, symphony and vocal ensembles.
  • All concerts are webcast
  • Language requirement – 200 level
  • Capstone for all students – paper, recital, and/or presentation.
  • Laboratory research common with access to paid summer internships

The Lawrence Personality

  • Curious students
  • Engaging
  • Collaborative (you kind of have to be in music!)
  • Positive and friendly
  • Energetic
  • Academic but well balanced

Lawrence has a residential campus – all 4 years, and is located in Appleton, a medium size community along the banks of a lovely meandering river.

Third stop – Ripon College in Ripon, Wisconsin. South of Appleton and north of Beloit, Ripon is set in the rolling hills of central Wisconsin. Named one of the “Coolest Small Towns in America,” downtown Ripon boasts an eclectic mix of architecture, shops, restaurants and coffee shops in one little down town. Ripon College consistently shows up on lists of colleges that offer the best value, which measure value, quality and overall student satisfaction. Ripon’s rating hovers around 95%. Here are a few facts:

  • 32 majors, 48 minors and pre-professional programs are available
  • Pre-professional programs are customized course plans setting the student on track for competitive placement in engineering, law, and medicine, among others.
  • 80% acceptance rate to medical school – twice the national average
  • Committed to affordability with 98% of students receiving aid awards
  • Scholarships range from $10,000 to full
  • Awards from $1,000 to $5,000
  • Grants college/state/federal from $600 to $19,000
  • Federal loans
  • 4 year graduation guarantee, assuming student is in good standing academically and does not change majors
  • Median class size is 17 with a 12:1 student/faculty ratio
  • Study abroad programs available
  • Division III athletics with 21 varsity teams

Fourth stop – Beloit College in Beloit, Wisconsin. Beloit College has always been one of my favorites. As a Colleges That Change Lives school, it produces top notch students. A few fun facts:

  • Top 20 college for producing future PhD’s
  • Top 21 college for training future leaders in science, international relations and business

The town of Beloit has come a long way since I first visited it 5 years ago. A former General Motors town, it has had to pull itself up by the bootstraps to overcome the economic crash and reinvent itself. Both the town and the college have an eclectic mix of things going on:

  • Believe it or not, Beloit is the home of the Beloit International Film Festival.
  • Organic potato chip factory
  • Organic market
  • Home of The Mind Set List; a list published in August with a snap shot of how the incoming freshman class views the world
  • Study abroad and international studies are strong with over 30 programs.
  • One of the best museum studies program in the country with a world class Archeology department and museum. The Indiana Jones character is based on an actual professor from Beloit, complete with bullwhip and hat!
  • 85% receive financial aid

Students coming to Beloit are:

  • Not likely to follow the crowd
  • Risk takers, out of the box thinkers
  • Interested in many things – open minded
  • Leaders, not followers
  • No core curriculum
  • Every student’s course of study or major is different

Carolyn’s College Profiles: Lewis & Clark >>

College Profile: Lewis & Clark College

by Carolyn Francis, College Counselor

Lewis_&_Clark_College,_Frank_Manor_House,_View_from_Reflecting_PoolLocated just on the outskirts of Portland, Oregon, Lewis and Clark sits on an old estate complete with lush gardens and forest pathways. The campus itself is split in two by the forest – academics on one side and student life and dorms on the other. It seems appropriate for this campus to have these two different worlds, as Lewis and Clark is proud of their rich academic and intellectual life on one hand, and social diversity and the outdoor world on the other. When applying to Lewis and Clark consider this interesting option: you can submit a portfolio of work instead of test scores. This speaks to their desire to have diverse, well-rounded class rooms.

With a relaxed atmosphere and inclusive community, Lewis and Clark is one of the leading small liberal arts schools on the west coast. There is a Core Curriculum that highlights exploration and discovery. Freshman year includes Freshman Seminar, which is centered on reading and writing. After that, 3 semesters of language, 2 classes of international affairs, 1 lab science and 3 sections of quantitative reasoning are required to graduate. Credits are distributed in thirds; one third major, one third electives, and one third liberal arts core.

With an emphasis on international study as part of their core curriculum, 6 out of 10 students study abroad at some point during their time at Lewis and Clark. Ranging from 6 months to a year, there is no limit to what is available to students. Financial aid is transferable to abroad programs, making it easy for all who wish to engage in experiential learning to take part. Internships are available as are research opportunities with faculty.

Lewis and Clark also has two graduate programs, one in Law and the other in Educational Counseling. Undergraduates total 1,985 and graduate students are 685 in Law and 758 in Education.

Lewis and Clark has representation from students around the world, which is a point of pride for them. With their Northwest location, over 90% of students participate in the outdoor rec program. Well supplied with equipment and students running the programs, there is not much students can’t do here. A free shuttle bus runs from campus to downtown Portland 7 days a week from 7am to the early morning hours; a plus for students wishing to take advantage of Portland’s arts and culture without the hassle of driving.

Residential life is 2 years on campus with “living and learning” options. About half of students stay on campus all four years. Lewis and Clark is also generous with merit aid, need-based grants, loans and/or work study.

When I asked my guide to sum up Lewis and Clark in 3 words, he struggled, so I allowed him to fudge a little. His words were: beautiful, intellectual and complex with an interesting social fabric. There is more below the surface at Lewis and Clark than what you see on the surface.

Carolyn’s College Corner >>

Carolyn’s College Corner

August 2014

With summer winding down and the new school year upon us, the College Corner is back in business! Our new building is very exciting for the high school: new gym, a dedicated performance space, playing fields and so much more. On a smaller level, I am excited as I move into my role as the College Counselor alongside Mr. McHenry. Look for the college bulletin board in the hallway announcing college visits, testing dates, college posters, college fair dates and other pertinent college information. I already have a number of schools asking to stop by and talk with interested students, so please make sure to look at the board and sign up for the visits you are interested in. All students are welcome, and it is never too early to start thinking about the next step after high school.

Juniors – I will be teaching the college prep class second block on Tuesdays and Thursdays. We will cover all aspects of the college admission process, what to expect, what matters, how to build a college list and what makes a “good fit.” We will work on resumes (high school version), talk about test prep and do some exercises to get your brain in gear for the upcoming spring and fall application seasons of 2015. Thinking ahead to test taking, college visits, essay writing and all other aspects of the college admission process will lessen your stress and make the process an enjoyable one. Remember, all your years of high school are important, but your junior year and senior year you must work at keeping your grades up!

Seniors – This is it! Your fall semester will be filled with juggling sports, extracurriculars, homework and getting your applications done! I will be running Sunday Jam Sessions beginning September 7th and running throughout the fall. I will send a separate email with dates and cost.
The Colleges That Change Lives Fair is coming to town! Please make sure to go if you can. It is the night you get home from the high school camping trip, but if you can make it I would highly encourage the extra effort to get down there.

The following dates are listed for your convenience:
Colleges That Change Lives Fair
August 26, 2014 7:00 pm
Hyatt Regency – Colorado Convention Center
650 15th Street
Denver, CO 20202

Denver Performing and Visual Arts Fair
October 22, 2014 6:00 – 8:00 pm
Cherry Creek High School

SAT & Subject Tests
October 11, 2014, November 8, 2014

ACT Dates
September 21, 2014, October 26, 2014, December 14, 2014

FAFSA available as of January 1, 2015

Gap Year Fair
January 15, 2015 5:30 – 8:00 pm
Denver Academy

I will keep you posted on events and announcements on a timely basis. Please look to this column for updates or you can contact me at carolyn@carolynf.com or check out my website at www.carolynfrancisconsulting.com.

Picture Day Details >>

Planning Ahead for Picture Day

We’re thrilled to be working with Jen Harris of JLH Photography for our school photos this year. Below, check out more information about the dates for your child’s picture taking session, and lots of details about how to order photos.

DWS Picture Day Information from Jen Harris

New Traffic Flow Map >>

New Campus – New Traffic Flow Map!

Please familiarize yourself with this traffic map before the first day of school. If we all work together to follow this plan, drop off and pick up traffic will be much smoother and more efficient for everyone. If you have questions about your particular situation, please contact the main office at (303) 777-0531.

 

traffic flow map-web

DWS to Relocate to New Campus on S. Pennsylvania St. >>

DWS to Relocate to New Campus on S. Pennsylvania St.

School celebrates 40th anniversary with larger campus, more amenities, including gyms, fields and theater

WALDORF new building shot with flower tree(20 of 55)The Denver Waldorf School (DWS) is excited to announce their relocation to a new, larger campus at 2100 S. Pennsylvania Street in Denver. This move is an important milestone in the 40-year history of the school, and corresponds with the school’s upcoming accreditation by the Association of Colorado Independent Schools.

At more than 80,000 square feet, this new building is nearly double the size of the school’s current facility. The new campus offers two gymnasiums, a full theatrical stage, and abundant outdoor playing fields. The campus is located adjacent to Harvard Gulch Park, which provides access to natural open space that will further enhance The Denver Waldorf School’s educational programs.

“With the additional space, we can now realize our full vision for the school’s curriculum. This campus is full of amenities, including dedicated spaces for practical and performing arts, two gyms, science labs, and a library, among other highlights. We can expand our enrollment, particularly in the high school, which will foster a more vibrant experience for our students,” said Judy Lucas, the Administrative Director of The Denver Waldorf School.

DWS entered into a contract with Denver Christian Schools to buy the property. Denver Christian Schools are consolidating their three existing campuses and moving to a new location in Lakewood.

“This new campus gives our kids the chance to have a Waldorf education enhanced by even more space and greater resources. We are truly looking forward to this new opportunity,” said Anne Macomber, parent of two DWS students. DWS expects to open its doors on the Pennsylvania St. campus on August 29, in time for the start of the 2014-15 school year.

6th Grade Poets Consider Past and Future>>

6th Grade Poets Consider Past and Future

Students in Brianna Kaiser’s 6th Grade class wrote poems that examined their experiences this year and anticipate the changes ahead in the upcoming year.

Hugh Justice Poem

by Hugh Justice

6th Poem 11_0001

by Max Christensen

6th Poem 10_0001

by Makana Aiu

6th Poem 8_0001

by Ian Rowland

6th Poem 9_0001

by Zoe Garcia

6th Poem 7_0001

by Alaina Johansson

6th Poem 6_0001

by Jaden Price

6th Poem 5_0001

by Sumanje Chigwenembe

6th Poem 4_0001

by Walt Jones

6th Poem 3_0001

by Nikos Salinas

6th Poem 2_0001

by Ivy Secrest

6th Poem 1_0001

by Sophie Clark

6th Poem 12_0001

by Vander Georgeff

6th Poem 13_0001

by Oliver Sumners

6th Poem 14_0001

by Colton Opyd

6th Poem 15_0001

by Aiden Gustafson

6th Poem 16_0001

by Niko Sandusky

6th Poem 17_0001

by Simone Wahl

6th Poem 18_0001

by Annika Ceder

6th Poem 19_0001

by Will Roberts

6th Poem 20_0001

by Bryn Creager

6th Poem 21_0001

by Vincent Gibbons

6th Poem 22_0001

by Kayla Neill

6th Poem 23_0001

by Ruby Rodriguez